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Tags explained

Here's a short explanation of what the various tags means.


Chip music

This tag is used to mark the track as being chip music.
The filetype doesn't matter. It can be WAV, MP3, OGG, XM, MOD, whatever. As long as it sounds chippy.
If you're looking for "real" chip music; i.e. music for one of the old 8-bit platforms, there's a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music" you can select. And to narrow down the search results, you can also select one of the "Compatible with ..." tags.


Chip: Compatible with Amstrad CPC

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with Amstrad CPC" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on an Amstrad CPC.


Chip: Compatible with Apple 2

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with Apple 2" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on an Apple 2.


Chip: Compatible with Atari Lynx

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with Atari Lynx" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on an Atari Lynx.


Chip: Compatible with Atari ST

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with Atari ST" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on an Atari ST.


Chip: Compatible with Atari XL/XE

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with Atari XL/XE" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on an Atari XL and Atari XE.


Chip: Compatible with C64 / C128

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with C64 / C128" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on a Commodore 64 and Commodore 128.


Chip: Compatible with MSX

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with MSX" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on an MSX.


Chip: Compatible with NEC PC-Engine/TurboGrafx-16

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files. The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music". To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music. "Compatible with NEC PC-Engine/TurboGrafx-16" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on an NEC PC-Engine/TurboGrafx-16.


Chip: Compatible with Nintendo Gameboy / Color

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files. The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music". To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music. "Compatible with Nintendo Gameboy" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on a Nintendo Gameboy.


Chip: Compatible with Nintendo NES

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files. The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music". To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music. "Compatible with Nintendo NES" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on a Nintendo NES.


Chip: Compatible with Oric

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with Oric" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on an Oric.


Chip: Compatible with Sega Genesis / Mega Drive

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files. The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music". To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music. "Compatible with Sega Genesis / Mega Drive" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on a Sega Genesis / Mega Drive.


Chip: Compatible with Sega Master System

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with Sega Master System" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on a Sega Master System.


Chip: Compatible with Sharp MZ-700

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with Sharp MZ-700" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on a Sharp MZ-700.


Chip: Compatible with Vectrex

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with Vectrex" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on a Vectrex.


Chip: Compatible with ZX Spectrum

Music for the oldest 8-bit platforms has been grouped together in a filetype called "chip", because there are so many variants of these files.
The same way, all the platforms has been grouped together in a platform called "8-bit platform - Chip music".
To distinguish between platforms, several "Compatible with ..." tags exists, only used for chip music.
"Compatible with ZX Spectrum" simply means, this is a chip tune that can be used on a ZX Spectrum.


MOD/Chip: Has room for sound-effects

Used for MOD and chip files to indicate that the musician made room for sound-effects on systems that only has limited channels available. Leaving room for sound-effects is done either by leaving 1-2 channels completely unused, or by designing the track in such a way that a channel or two is interruptable without ruining the music.


MOD/Chip: Sounds best in (almost) mono

Used for MOD and chip files to indicate that this track should preferably be played either in mono, or else with a low stereo separation such as max 20% if possible.
Most MODs will benefit from playback in this mode.


MOD/Chip: Sounds best in stereo

Used for MOD and chip files to indicate that this track should be played either in full stereo, or else with a high stereo separation such as 80%. Speaker assignment for each channel should be Left Right Right Left.
MODs tagged with this tag are ideal for platforms like the Amiga, which has no option of reducing stereo separation. But they'll of course sound great on any platform that is capable of playback in stereo.


MOD: Precise timing NOT required

Used for MOD files to indicate that this track is NOT using techniques that requires a playerlib with precise timing. Examples of such techniques could be "The 14-bit trick" and any kind of filter that requires two samples to be played at the exact same time.

If you're not sure what your playerlib can handle, include this tag in your search to be sure the MOD will play correctly.
(Alternatively, make a render of the MOD with your player and send it to the musician so he can check if it plays correctly. Then mail your discoveries to webmaster@indiegamemusic.com so we can update the list below).

Here's a list of players we know has such precise timing:
Amiga: Protracker 2.3d
Amiga: Hippoplayer
Amiga: Delitracker
Amiga: EaglePlayer (only left speaker supported though)
Amiga: AMOS built-in playerlib
Amiga: PHX's protracker player with support for external sound effects
Atari Jaguar: U-235

Here's a list of players we know does NOT have such precise timing:
Amiga: Protracker 3.61


MOD: Precise timing required

Used for MOD files to indicate that this track is using techniques that requires a playerlib with precise timing. Examples of such techniques could be "The 14-bit trick" and any kind of filter that requires two samples to be played at the exact same time.

If you know that your playerlib has such precise timing, you can include this tag in your search to find MODs that takes advantage of these options, and give you features like 14-bit (pseudo) quality and various filter effects.

Here's a list of players we know has such precise timing:
Amiga: Protracker 2.3d
Amiga: Hippoplayer
Amiga: Delitracker
Amiga: EaglePlayer (only left speaker supported though)
Amiga: AMOS built-in playerlib
Amiga: PHX's protracker player with support for external sound effects
Atari Jaguar: U-235


Here's a list of players we know does NOT have such precise timing:
Amiga: Protracker 3.61


Music has an ending (Doesn't loop)

This tag means that the track either fades out or else has an ending that clearly indicates that the track is over.
Tracks marked with this tag are not suitable for looping.


Music is loop-able, but also has an ending

This tag tells that the track can be looped, but it doesn't have to be looped.
This is achieved by giving the track an ending combined with a timing. For example, the track could end with some drums that provides a break in the track, so that a pause comes naturally - whereafter the track restarts, giving an impression of a loop.
This technique was used a lot on the old JavaME platform, because the platform technically just can't perform a smooth loop.
It can also be used for the mp3 format, which technically can't do a smooth loop either.


Music requires/does smooth looping

Tracks marked with this tag requires to be looped smoothly, in order for it to sound fine. Minor gaps between plays will ruin the music.
Because of this requirement, there are certain file-types you'll never see marked with this tag. MP3 for example, technically can't be played in a smoothly looping state.
You will find OGG, FLAC and WAV files marked with this tag. And tracker formats can also be marked with this tag, typically to indicate that the track automatically loops to a previous pattern at the end of the track.